What You Have To Know

Frequently Asked Questions

Q- What is the minimum age to participate in axe throwing?

A- You must be 15 years old to participate in axe throwing Sunday through Thursday and 21 years old on Friday and Saturday after (6pm).
* Unless with parent supervision.

Q- Do I need to arrive early for my reservation?

A- Yes, we encourage your whole group to arrive 20 minutes before your reservation time begins to ensure you get the most of your time slot.

Q- Can I wear flip flops to participate in axe throwing?

A- No- You must wear closed toed shoes to participate.

Q- Can I come without a reservation?

A- Yes. Walk ins are permitted, but please note that you may have to wait for a lane to open. We strongly recommend a reservation to prevent a long wait or being turned away (which we really hate doing).

Q- Can I bring my own food/beverages?

A- Yes. We do not offer food options, but we can make suggestions of nearby places that can provide it for you. We can supply you with buckets of ice for whatever you bring in! (Hint, hint: Rhyme time- cheer and fine) If you plan to have food and beverage, we encourage you to bring your own plates, cups, utensils and napkins.

Q- What should I wear?

A- We recommend cool, loose clothing that is easy for you to move in. Carrying in a sweatshirt or a flannel is always recommended, we do have air conditioning.

Q- Can I provide my own axe?

A- Yes, but all axes must first be approved by the Down the Hatchet staff.

Q- Is there a minimum amount of people to have your own private range?

A- Yes, groups of 5 and less can and will possibly be paired with other smaller groups when business volume is high. However, you can always request ( additional fee ) a guaranteed private range.

Safety Procedures*

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    Axes are to be counted and distributed solely for proper use. They are to be distributed in and limited to designated use area. When not in use they are to be secured away from any non-employees.

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    Only persons who have signed an acceptable “waiver of all claims” shall be permitted to participate or stand in the activity area as spectators.

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    Only persons who have received appropriate instruction and caution may participate or spectate in the activity area.

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    Horseplay will not be tolerated.

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    Visibly intoxicated persons shall not participate nor be present in the activity area.

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    Visibly intoxicated persons shall not be permitted to execute an acceptable waiver.

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    Closed toed shoes will be required at all times.

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    Only one person per target allowed in the throwing zone.

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    Axes can only be retrieved once both patrons throw.

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    After your throw, the axe is returned to its holder.

*Failure to follow procedures set forth by management may result in terminating your game.

Axe Throwing User Guide:

What You Need to Know About Throwing Axes

Axe throwing is a sport that has been around for many years, but only recently has it entered the urban world of North America. Today, bars and clubs around the US and Canada have opened up axe throwing areas, but the real competition is found in two leagues, the World Axe Throwing League (WATL) and the National Axe Throwing Federation (NATF).

Axe throwing goes back to the lumberjack competitions that have been around for over a century, but the current popularity means that people living in urban and suburban areas can find ways to participate and compete. Here is what you need to know about axe throwing that will make your experience the best it can be.

Axes

Axes come in different sizes, although you do not want to confuse them with hatchets. While quite similar in appearance, the one major difference is that hatchets are designed to be used with one hand while axes are used with two hands. So, if your intention is to toss axes, then you should start with a small one which is easier to handle.

Targets

Most targets are made from wood and resemble the inner rings of a tree trunk. In fact, many tree trunks are used as targets with rings which represent different points when the blade sinks into the surface. In this respect, axe throwing resembles darts in that there is a bullseye, rings that offer different points, and each game can be counted down to zero.

However, most axe throwing competitions will have Clutches or Kill Shots which are separate scoring areas only legal on the final throw of the round or match.

Technique

Similar to darts or bowling, the key to successfully tossing an axe is using the right technique. This usually consists of holding the axe in front of you with both hands, drawing it back behind your head, and throwing it to the target area. Keep in mind that axe tossing is different than hatchet tossing, which only requires one hand.

Safety

Although accidents are rare in competitions, there are dangers associated with tossing an axe which sports a sharp, heavy blade. You’ll notice in axe throwing tournaments and arenas that are found in bars and clubs the area is marked off, so that non-participants will not wind up anywhere near the target area.

Rules are in place as to when someone can physically approach a target to measure or remove an axe.

In competitions, both participants must throw their axes together and then retrieve them at the same time.

Plus, when practicing it is recommended that you set up an area which limits accessibility to further enhance safety.

All in all, those who wish to throw axes are encouraged to visit a local club or bar that offers axe throwing.

The sport itself is simple to learn, but difficult to master which helps make it popular. For many, axe throwing is a fun, enjoyable time that makes for a wonderful hobby.